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ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN
HISTORICAL TIMELINE DETAILS IN THE YEAR 2001

Our victories, obstacles and leaders (Part 2)


Discover additional specific info on the many links (outlined in "red" or "blue") listed below


2001 
NATIONAL MEMORIAL FOR JAPANESE AMERICANS

The new national memorial dedicated to Japanese American veterans of World War II and to people of Japanese descent who were forced into internment camps in California and other Western states during the war opened June 2001. It is located near the National Mall, the latest monument in the nation's capital dedicated to members of the World War II generation.

2001 
ARCADIA'S 1ST AA SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
Reflecting Arcadia's changing demographics, Annie Yuen became the first Asian American on the school board. The community, where more than 54% of the students in the public schools are of Asian descent, gave Yuen 30.3% of the vote to win her seat on the Arcadia Unified School District board.

2001 
LACK OF POLITICAL CLOUT IN NEW YORK

Although New Yorkers have elected a multitude of African Americans and Latinos to office, no Asian American has ever won a local election.

2001 
NY CHINESE DISPLAY POLITICAL CLOUT

Despite New York's Asian Americans reaching 10% of the city's population, the largest of any ethnic minority in the Big Apple, community leaders needed to form a special coalition to stopped the closing New York's bustling Chinatown's main subway stop for four years on July 1, 2000 while a nearby bridge is repaired. There was no public hearing, no consulting with the community.

2001 
ETHNIC STEREOTYPES IN THE PRINT MEDIA
Political cartoons, radio high jinks and satiric skits that feature Chinese characters with thick glasses, buck teeth and heavy Asian accents sound like a throwback to an era when American society lacked sophistication and tolerance. But these scenes played out across the country after China detained 24 Navy crew members whose spy plane collided with a Chinese fighter jet. Some observers say the backlash rivals the anti-Asian sentiments of World War II and before.

2001 
CHINA RELEASES SPY PLANE

China
releases the 24 detainees/hostages from the spy plane that crashed in Hainan Island

2001 
CHINESE IN NEW ORLEANS

Shaie-Mei Temple, a New Orleanian of Chinese descent, observes some things that were at the heart of the troubles associated with the Spy Plane Incident between the U.S. and China.

Chinese and American leaders are tripping over a manner divide. Americans are direct and straightforward, not only in what they say and how they say it. When they come to see you they say their say in the most terse, concise and unambiguous manner.

Chinese never approach the subject utmost in their minds until polite courtesies are exchanged. These elaborate preludes and interludes may seem useless and superfluous to Americans but are considered essential to the Chinese who have raised correct deportment almost to the rank of religion.

2001 
STILL NO APA'S IN THE MEDIA (REPORT)
More than a year after the major TV networks agreed to better reflect America's ethnic mix, broadcasters continue to marginalize minorities and women, according to a new study by the organization "Children Now."

2001 
REMAPPING GIVES ASIANS A GREATER VOICE
The Virginia State House Privileges and Elections Committee approved a redistricting plan that creates the first legislative districts to accommodate Northern Virginia's fast-growing Hispanic and Asian populations. Both the House and Senate districts would take in the entire Baileys Crossroads area of Fairfax County, which is 35 percent Hispanic, 12 percent Asian and 15 percent black. There are no Asians or Hispanics among the 140 members of the General Assembly. The state's Asian population is 261,025.

2001 
REP. DAVID WU DENIED ENTRANCE

The only Chinese-American member of Congress says he was refused entry at the Department of Energy by security guards who repeatedly (3 times) asked him if he was a U.S. citizen.

Wu, who sits on the Energy Subcommittee of the House Science Committee, had been invited to address department employees Wednesday during Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. Wu said he was denied access even after showing his congressional identification.

Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham apologize to David Wu and that his agency would conduct an internal review, including a look at discrimination.

Wu deals regularly with issues of discrimination against Asian-Americans and has taken a special interest in concerns by DOE lab employees concerned about the federal government's handling of the Wen Ho Lee case.

Wu's letter to Abraham on Thursday to complain about the way he was treated and the signal that treatment sends to Asian-Americans. "The conduct of the DOE guards is both ironic and disturbing," he said. "Ironic because I was invited by DOE to speak about the progress Asian Pacific Americans have made in America. My citizenship has never been questioned at the White House, the Supreme Court or in the U.S. Capitol -- all locations with potentially sensitive information."

Wu said he is disturbed that the incident may represent "the tip of the iceberg" for Asian-Americans employees and potential employees at DOE.

"My understanding is some of the brightest graduate students in the country, who happen to be Asian-American, are refusing to go to work for the Department of Energy."

"I am going to encourage the Department of Energy to redouble its efforts and engage in a true process of soul searching," he said. " Do you really ask everyone their citizenship at the door? And if so, is that an effective way of enhancing national security?"

2001 
BUSH RENEWS EXECUTIVE ORDER 13125
On June 6, 2001, President George W. Bush signed an amendment to Executive Order 13125, extending the President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders for an additional two years. Executive Order 13125 aims to increase the participation of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in federal programs where they are currently underserved.

"This is a wonderful news for the Asian American and Pacific Islander community," said John Quoc Duong, the recently named Executive Director of the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

The President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders advises the President on the development, monitoring, and coordination of federal efforts to improve the quality of life of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, through public sector, private sector, and community involvement.

2001 
LAST RURAL CHINATOWN SAVED
People of Chinese descent are buying land in America's last rural Chinatown at Locke, a cluster of rundown buildings and wornout streets.

The Sacramento County Board of Supervisors voted 5-0 to spend $250,000 to buy the land under the clapboard houses and businesses built by Chinese immigrants who came to work the railroads, river levees, and area farms in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The land, in turn, will be sold at no profit to the people who live and work in Locke today. About 85 residents remain, fewer than a dozen of them Chinese-Americans.

The history of Locke, which lies along a levee about 30 miles south of Sacramento, is as rich as the soil that gives up asparagus and other vegetables in abundance. Listed as a National Historic Landmark since 1990, it is the nation's last remaining rural town built for the Chinese by the Chinese. Their hands reclaimed both the San Joaquin River delta and erected the two-story buildings with the now-sagging balconies along Main Street.

Settled in 1915 by a group of Chinese merchants after fire destroyed their old quarters in neighboring Walnut Grove, the 10-acre town of Locke grew to a population of about 500. In town, there was a Chinese school, a Chinese movie theater, a Chinese herbalist, and grocery stores and restaurants catering to Chinese tastes, not to mention a gambling parlor, brothel, and an opium den or two.

The Chinese immigrants and families were never able to own land, barred by the Alien Land Act of 1913 and a 1920. The laws were aimed at the turn-of-the-century influx of Japanese, but also served to stop ownership by immigrants forced to segregate themselves into so-called Chinatowns.

2001 
RELIEF TO NEW YORK'S CHINATOWN
To address Sept. 11 New York's Chinatown victims, the Asian American Federation of New York and four other Asian American groups (Coalition for Asian American Children & Families, Filipino American Human Services, etc.) are addressing this need by providing a new resource center.

The center will be staffed with volunteer attorneys, mental health counselors and accountants to assist residents who have suffered financially and emotionally since Sept. 11.

Asian American Federation of New York's Charlie Lai said his organization secured private grants totaling $800,000 from United Way's September 11th Fund and the McCormick-Tribune Foundation to address unmet needs of the Asian community.

In addition to providing about $250,000 in direct cash assistance, the center will provide help with filling out applications for aid, and referrals to aid agencies for more serious cases.

Homebound seniors, children, those left unemployed by the disaster and small business owners are among those most affected.

2001 
JUSTICE DEPARTMENT RELEASES WEN HO LEE DOCUMENTS

The U.S. Department of Justice released a report on December 17, 2001 that reviewed the investigation of former nuclear scientist Wen Ho Lee.

The report, which was critical of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the handling of the case, hammered the agency for its failing to move the case expeditiously and for placing it on a low priority.

The report also chastises the FBI for its ineffective communications with the Energy Department.

Lee has filed a law suit against the government for defamation and is set to release his new autobiography, My Country Versus Me: The First-Hand Account by the Los Alamos Scientist Who Was Falsely Accused of Being a Spy.

The full DOJ report is available online by clicking HERE

2001 
PRENATAL CARE AMONG ASIAN AMERICAN WOMEN

Research conducted by HRSA found significant differences in use of prenatal care among Asian American ethnic groups..

The study, "Prenatal Care Use Among Selected Asian American Groups," looked at all single live births among mothers of Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese background by analyzing four years of U.S. vital records. It investigated three patterns of prenatal care - no care, late initiation of care and inadequate use of care after early initiation. It is the first national-level study of prenatal care use by the four major Asian American ethnic groups.

Study findings indicate that:

  • Korean and Vietnamese Americans had the lowest levels of prenatal care use;
  • Young or single motherhood, a woman's having a significant number of previous births for her age and low level of education were main risk factors for low use of prenatal care;
  • Being foreign-born increased the risk of starting prenatal care late for all groups except
  • Vietnamese Americans, for whom this decreased the risk; and
  • Parents of the same ethnic background increased the risk of starting prenatal care late for Korean Americans but decreased the risk for Japanese and Vietnamese Americans.



Click HERE to continue the timeline of the year of 2001.

Click on the appropriate below-listed section to discover the other events that occurred to the Asian Pacific American communities during the year of 2001.

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